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Paratissima/Crafters & Makers

Paratissima 14 ‘Feeling Different’ was a big success. Great turn out and a great team of people. Some shots of the floor plan construction and the Crafters & Makers section. Special thanks to Azahara, Marina and Raul!

https://paratissima.it/paratissima-14-feeling-different/ h

Paratissima venue and designs

This years Paratissima “Feeling Different” opens on October 31st, Caserma Alessandro La Marmora, Via Asti, Torino. I’m working on this one as part of the install team. Here are some pre-build interior shots and some working signage drawings. I will be in at the Crafters and Makers section until November 5th. Come on down

http://paratissima.it/paratissima-14-feeling-different/

Masking failure?

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I gave up on this piece about two years ago. For reasons that I can’t remember, the initial promise over these two images soon disappeared. After recently going though the archive of older work, I came across it again and then thought of an experiment. The original intention of images can so often be mistaken these days, constant recycling and the porous online world allows for essageration to appear on a daily basis. Another thing was that I have always been told to avoid describing your work at all costs, but the current trend is to do just that, using thirty hashtags or less most of the time. What if I were to utilise these common practices with something that (in reality) failed, then see how it compared with a legitimate piece of work...?

Would a higher number of tags, likes, new followers, comments etc, with relation to this image, subvert the purpose of a work or what is actually means.

I posted this failed image about a week ago and explained the experiment. Usual posts after this amount time reach around thirty likes and result in five or six new followers. This one after a week ‘outperformed’ most of my actual work by about twenty percent across all categories…

Is this purely down to publicity? Timing?? Probably, but it makes you think about the perception of any given image, even if it’s rubbish in the first place

Timewasters...

These images make up part of an ongoing collection dedicated to lost time. The buffer screen is something that we are all familiar with and every single instance presents an interesting visual paradox. Each one is obviously part of something larger but because of a technical glitch the image becomes serendipitous and shown over a longer period than was intended. It gave me the opportunity to recognise formal qualities at random; something that you also do when presented with a painting or photograph that you haven't seen before.

No matter which platform that you are on, the loading symbol has connotations of frustration and 'dead time'... but purely because we are forced to look at it, the image behind it takes on much the same role that advertising does. You don't choose to look at it but it's there nevertheless.

Any guesses as to what they're from..?

Contribute with your own buffer moments #TimewastersArtProject. Further the collection!

 

The Coincidences project

Whenever you get to the end of a feature film, there is always a part which reads something like this:    The characters in this teleplay are fictitious. Any similarity between actual persons, alive or dead, is entirely coincidental... etc   This indicates that the film companies are unsettled by the fact that people can sometimes look like other people; even if they are entirely made up, as the tone of the statement reveals, any apparent resemblance could lead to an image rights problem or something similar. However, it also indicates that any said producer is unwilling take responsibility for a pure coincidence. If, as many think, a coincidence is just a coincidence, then this brings up some interesting questions about falsity and characterisation.    Surely you must look like someone in a film somewhere? Is everything a coincidence? It just depends on where you are and who you're talking to etc? Is something still coincidental even if it's staged?   Overall, this project is about the last question. I think it would be interesting to fabricate exactly what the film people have warned against and provide 'evidence' of yourself as being that coincidental resemblance.   How to take part:   I would like you to take a photograph/record a short clip of a scene that you've made up .   It could be any film genre; thriller, comedy, period drama, sports...   Dress up   Use props   Do a group shot   Go on location   Make sure you’re in it   As long as the image could credibly pass as being from a random film   DON’T simply re-create something you've already seen however. It would, ironically, shatter the illusion of whether you are a coincidence or not. -----------------------------------------------------   Send your image to samvickersart@gmail.com

Whenever you get to the end of a feature film, there is always a part which reads something like this:

The characters in this teleplay are fictitious. Any similarity between actual persons, alive or dead, is entirely coincidental... etc

This indicates that the film companies are unsettled by the fact that people can sometimes look like other people; even if they are entirely made up, as the tone of the statement reveals, any apparent resemblance could lead to an image rights problem or something similar. However, it also indicates that any said producer is unwilling take responsibility for a pure coincidence. If, as many think, a coincidence is just a coincidence, then this brings up some interesting questions about falsity and characterisation.

Surely you must look like someone in a film somewhere? Is everything a coincidence? It just depends on where you are and who you're talking to etc? Is something still coincidental even if it's staged?

Overall, this project is about the last question. I think it would be interesting to fabricate exactly what the film people have warned against and provide 'evidence' of yourself as being that coincidental resemblance.

How to take part:

I would like you to take a photograph/record a short clip of a scene that you've made up .

It could be any film genre; thriller, comedy, period drama, sports...

Dress up

Use props

Do a group shot

Go on location

Make sure you’re in it

As long as the image could credibly pass as being from a random film

DON’T simply re-create something you've already seen however. It would, ironically, shatter the illusion of whether you are a coincidence or not. -----------------------------------------------------

Send your image to samvickersart@gmail.com